How electric trucks will change your shop
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On the Road

How electric trucks will change your shop

David Sickels is the Senior Editor of Fleet Equipment. He has a history of working in the media, marketing and automotive industries in both print and online.

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You might be interested in electric trucks, but the trouble is, like many other exciting new technologies, your initial excitement often gives way to questions of practicality. “This would be so cool” morphs into “Wait, how would this work, exactly?”

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Here is a transcript of the video:

From infrastructure to charging necessities, there’s a lot to figure out if you are interested in running EVs. One of the items that should be high on your list is how the introduction of these trucks will impact truck service. If you’re running your own service shop, you will need to be prepared for an electric truck long before one ever enters your bays.

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The No. 1 thing to keep in mind when servicing battery electric and hydrogen fuel cell trucks is safety, and the regulations in place to keep this top of mind for technicians. Of course, both types of trucks operate with extremely high voltage, and local regulations and building codes are going to vary. If you have questions, give your local fire department a call. They should be able to help.

Next, although this isn’t a code or rule, it really should be: You should have at least one designated bay for electric vehicle repair. This doesn’t mean that bay needs to only be exclusively used for EV work, just make it so that when an electric truck does come in for any service, that bay is where it goes. This will help prevent high voltage electrical exposure to untrained technicians or personnel. This bay is also where you will keep all the specialized tools you’ll need to work on high-voltage vehicles.

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Charging is, of course, also key, and the appropriate charging equipment should be installed at this bay too. As part of your service routine, the vehicle should leave the bay charged. Also remember to install sensors for detecting leaks and fans that are used to pressurize the bay and to remove the gas very quickly.

Beyond this basic list, when in doubt, check with your OEM. This technology is still considered brand new, so your truck OEM will be your primary source of information and training on their EVs.

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