Watch: Three lessons learned from the ELD mandate

Watch: Three lessons learned from the ELD mandate

If your fleet has drivers who are currently required to keep records of duty service, Dec. 16, 2019 is a date with which you should be very familiar. That’s the day your fleet must start to use the electronic logging devices known as ELDs that are registered with the Federal Motor Carrier and Safety Administration, or FMCSA.

If your fleet has drivers who are currently required to keep records of duty service, Dec. 16, 2019 is a date that you should be very familiar with. That’s the day your fleet must start to use the electronic logging devices known as ELDs that are registered with the Federal Motor Carrier and Safety Administration, or FMCSA.

This ELD mandate means there’s now a level playing field. All carriers, no matter the size, are running with the same set of rules. It’s going to influence how carriers and shippers do business for the foreseeable future, and so now is a great time to apply the lessons learned from year one of the ELD mandate into your strategy going forward.

When the FMCSA published the ELD Final Rule in 2015, fleets and carriers had two years to prepare for the switch from paper logs to ELDs. But even with all that time to prepare, many in the transportation industry just weren’t ready for the December 2017 deadline and experienced a culture shock about the realities of operating with ELDs.

That’s why our first lesson is … watch the video to find out.

Watch the video above to learn more, and click here for more episodes of On the Road.

You can review hours of service rules before this year’s deadline online at www.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations/hours-of-service.

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