The unintended ADAS consequences of seemingly unrelated truck repairs

The unintended ADAS consequences of seemingly unrelated truck repairs

A truck rolls into a service shop and needs a radiator replaced. The technician dutifully does the job, moving components out of the way, replacing the radiator and putting everything back into place. The truck rolls out, but when the truck rolls under certain overpasses, a shuddering of the active brake assist systems runs through the truck. The driver overrides with the accelerator, but something is clearly wrong.

So what happened?

“We’ve heard numerous reports of vehicles that just stop when they come to an overpass because the ADAS system interprets that as an object they’re coming up on,” said Ben Johnson, director of product management, Mitchell 1. “If the driver loses confidence in the system, then that defeats the purpose of putting them on the truck. We don’t want that to happen.”

The challenge is that ADAS isn’t a service category yet. The black box that was moved out of the way to replace a radiator needs proper calibration after it was moved. Yet every truck manufacturer has its own way of integrating those components, so placement of ADAS components can vary. I caught up with Johnson for his advice on how to ensure proper ADAS operation after a service event. Watch the video above for his insight.

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